STRONG. The Magazine for Girls.
STRONG. The Magazine for Girls.

This project has already launched.

STRONG.

The Magazine for Girls.

"STRONG aims to empower girls to be the best version of themselves they can possibly be by presenting them with strong female role models and encouraging their interests and passions, wherever they may lie."

I would love help from the Kickstarter community to launch a different kind of magazine for middle school aged girls.  The magazine will be advertisement free and because we're starting small, printing and distribution costs are high.  Find out all about STRONG below and help us to bring this amazing and worthwhile project to life!

Women make up more than 50% of the workforce but hold just 26% of tech industry jobs. Only 11% of executives at Forbes 500 companies are female. We have never had a female President or Vice President. The list of careers in which women are underrepresented is very, very long. But the world is changing. Huge strides have been made in recent decades and more and more women are taking their place in the world in areas that have traditionally been male dominated. STRONG aims to show our girls these women, these options, their world, and to help them find their rightful place in it.

 

                      

WHAT IS STRONG?

STRONG is a new magazine for middle school aged girls that seeks to break the mold!  Many publications for this age group focus on fashion, celebrities, body image and boys.  At a time in their lives when girls are trying to decide how they fit in and who they should be, STRONG magazine will provide girls with strong female role models and a balanced, tolerant and diverse view of the world they live in.  It will show our youth that girls have passions and interests that extend far beyond the female stereotypes they are so often surrounded by.

                 

HOW I GOT THE IDEA...

The idea for STRONG came from talking to my own daughters, Lucy and Daisy.  

Lucy and Daisy with Frankie
Lucy and Daisy with Frankie

They are full of enthusiasm for life and they exhaust me with their energy for trying out anything and everything.  In school, their grades are good, and I really feel as though they can do anything they set their minds to.  Imagine my shock though when I realized that they don't always feel the same way!  After a conversation with them about a year ago I realized that somewhere, deep down, they didn't really think they could be engineers or architects or President of the Universe (a job one of my kids once said she really wanted!).  They thought that, realistically, they'd be teachers, stay at home parents, or nurses. Traditionally "female" roles.  I have no issue with my daughters being those things if that's what they chose to do.  They are valuable, rewarding careers.  But I was horrified that my girls were already mentally putting themselves in a box, and ruling out options simply because they're female. "Girls don't really do that kind of thing." has haunted me ever since!

I started to look at the world through their eyes.  I looked at the magazines on the shelves in stores; I looked at the programs they were watching on TV and the books they were reading that often featured male protagonists. I looked at the school photo company that gave kids the option to put their school photo into a "magazine cover" where the girls were offered pink print and articles on "BFFs" and the boys' photo magazine cover was blue and featured articles on being outdoors and building things. I looked at the news. I looked at our own family where I gave up a successful career to raise our kids and my husband works long hours in a male dominated field.  I decided I had to do something. I had to show our girls and girls like them that they can truly be whoever they want to be. I had to show them that there are women out there breaking glass ceilings and following their dreams, and fighting to be the best version of themselves, unconstrained by society's view of who they should be.

                

ALL ABOUT STRONG...

The first issue of STRONG is almost ready to go and features articles on camping, financial management, the inspiring refugee-turned-Olympian, Yusra Mardini, National TaeKwonDo Champion Emily Fields and much, much, more.  

Inside front cover of first issue of STRONG. The Magazine for Girls.
Inside front cover of first issue of STRONG. The Magazine for Girls.

 

An article on financial management...
An article on financial management...

 

A great role model - Yusra Mardini.
A great role model - Yusra Mardini.

Regular features will be "Strong Body" where girls are shown healthy recipes and strategies for keeping their bodies strong, as well as "Strong Mind" where we look at some of the emotional issues this age group are dealing with. We will also have a regular feature entitled "Growing up in...." which will talk to girls either from other cultures growing up in the United States, or girls living overseas. In the first issue we feature a 14-year-old growing up in Cape Town, South Africa, to find out how her life differs from ours. 

Gina Wither describes her life in Cape Town, South Africa.
Gina Wither describes her life in Cape Town, South Africa.

  

We will have book, movie, music and app reviews and a regular "Little Miss Fix It" column - the first issue shows readers how to fix a puncture on their bike. 

A book review and Little Miss Fix It!
A book review and Little Miss Fix It!

 

The magazine will also feature quizzes and inspirational quotes as well as articles on girls their age, the hobbies they have and the things they do that have a positive impact on the world.

A quiz in the first issue...
A quiz in the first issue...

 

A high school Freshman who is a National TaeKwonDo Champion!
A high school Freshman who is a National TaeKwonDo Champion!

 

We aim to keep the magazine ad free.

WHERE YOU COME IN!

Because we're avoiding ads and starting small, printing and distribution costs are high.  Also, so far this has been a work of love - friends and acquaintances with expertise in certain areas have helped to write articles, take pictures, proof read, edit, and model.  Going forward I would love to grow the magazine and be able to bring in expert writers, or just pay the brilliant people I already have!

The first issue is just about ready to go.  My next step is to print off a limited number and put it in front of a focus group of middle school aged girls and their parents to get their feedback.  Then, I'd love to be able to run the first print run and get this new magazine out there for you all to read! All of that costs money, which is why I'm launching my Kickstarter campaign.  I would love your backing to help my dream become a reality and, in doing so, to help all of our daughters to do the same.

Thank you!

Sarah Beach

Founder, STRONG. The Magazine for Girls.

www.strongmagazineforgirls.com

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